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Carteolol Medication Information - Glaucoma and Eye Pressure

This page contains links to eMedTV Glaucoma Articles containing information on subjects from Carteolol Medication Information to Glaucoma and Eye Pressure. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Carteolol Medication Information
    Are you looking for information on carteolol? This eMedTV selection has details on this prescription eyedrop, including what conditions it can treat, how often the medication is used, and what to discuss with your healthcare provider.
  • Causes of Glaucoma
    Although the causes of glaucoma are not known, many factors increase the risk of developing the condition. This eMedTV page discusses specific risk factors (such as having diabetes or a family history of glaucoma) associated with the eye disease.
  • Claucoma
    Glaucoma is a group of diseases that can lead to optic nerve damage. This part of the eMedTV site describes other problems that may occur with glaucoma and lists common symptoms of the condition. Claucoma is a common misspelling of glaucoma.
  • Combagan
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, Combigan contains two ingredients that work together to lower eye pressure. This article gives an introduction to these eye drops and provides a link to more information. Combagan is a common misspelling of Combigan.
  • Combigan
    As a prescription eye drop, Combigan contains two medications that work together to lower eye pressure. This eMedTV article explains how this medicine works, lists potential side effects, and offers tips on when and how to use it.
  • Combigan and Breastfeeding
    The manufacturer of Combigan does not recommend breastfeeding while using the eye drops. This eMedTV page discusses whether Combigan (brimonidine/timolol) passes through breast milk and, if it does, whether it is likely to cause problems in a child.
  • Combigan and Pregnancy
    It is unclear if pregnant women should use Combigan (brimonidine/timolol). This eMedTV page discusses the problem that occurred when the eye drop was given to pregnant animals and explains why it's important to discuss the risks with your doctor.
  • Combigan Dosage
    The standard Combigan dosage is one drop in the affected eye(s) twice daily. This selection from the eMedTV library offers more detailed dosing guidelines for the eye drops, including information on preventing contamination.
  • Combigan Drug Interactions
    Several drugs can interact with Combigan, including reserpine, digoxin, and other eye medications. This eMedTV page provides an in-depth list of drugs that may interact with the eye drop, as well as information on the problems that can occur.
  • Combigan Eye Drops
    Available in the form of eye drops, Combigan is a prescription drug designed to lower eye pressure. This eMedTV segment tells you what you need to know about this product, with details on potential side effects, who can use it, and more.
  • Combigan for Glaucoma
    If you have chronic open-angle glaucoma, your healthcare provider may recommend Combigan eye drops. This eMedTV segment talks about using this medication for glaucoma and provides a link to more detailed information.
  • Combigan Ophthalmic
    Combigan is a prescription eye drop used to lower pressure in the eye. This eMedTV selection gives a brief description of the drug and provides a link to more detailed information. Combigan ophthalmic is a common variation of Combigan.
  • Combigan Overdose
    As this eMedTV page explains, a Combigan overdose could lead to dizziness, shortness of breath, and other problems. This article talks about what you can expect if too much of this medication is used, including potential treatment options.
  • Combigan Side Effects
    The most common Combigan side effects include eye allergies and redness. However, as this eMedTV article explains, most people are able to use the medication without any problems. This resource offers a more detailed list of potential side effects.
  • Combigan Uses
    As explained in this part of the eMedTV site, Combigan is used to lower eye pressure in people with open-angle glaucoma or certain other conditions. This page further describes what the drug is approved for and offers an explanation of how it works.
  • Combigan Warnings and Precautions
    In many cases, Combigan is not recommended for people with lung problems like asthma or COPD. This eMedTV page lists other Combigan precautions and warnings, and covers what to discuss with your healthcare provider before using this eye medication.
  • Combigen
    Combigan is an eye drop used twice a day to treat high eye pressure. This part of the eMedTV site takes a quick look at this product and offers some basic dosing guidelines. Combigen is a common misspelling of Combigan.
  • Cosept
    People who have high eye pressure due to certain medical conditions may benefit from treatment with Cosopt. This eMedTV segment provides a brief overview of this drug, with a link to more information on it. Cosept is a common misspelling of Cosopt.
  • Cosopt
    Cosopt is a combination medication used to treat a certain kind of glaucoma as well as ocular hypertension. This eMedTV segment provides detailed information on this prescription eye drop, such as dosing, possible side effects, and safety precautions.
  • Cosopt Active Ingredients
    This page from the eMedTV library discusses the active ingredients in Cosopt, a medicine used to reduce pressure in the eyes. It offers a few specific safety precautions for this product and includes a link to more information on this prescription drug.
  • Cosopt and Breastfeeding
    This page from the eMedTV library explains why the manufacturer of Cosopt recommends avoiding it if you are breastfeeding. This segment also describes why some healthcare providers may still prescribe the drug and what to watch for in the nursing infant.
  • Cosopt and Pregnancy
    This eMedTV page explains that even though Cosopt is a pregnancy Category C drug, it could still be recommended if the benefits outweigh the risks. This article also describes what happened when this medicine was used in pregnant animal studies.
  • Cosopt Dosage
    Everyone is prescribed the same dose of Cosopt, regardless of other factors like age or medical history. This eMedTV Web page explains what this dosage is and why you should not increase it, and offers tips for contact lens wearers.
  • Cosopt Drug Interactions
    If aspirin, digoxin, or other eye medicines are combined with Cosopt, serious drug interactions could occur. This eMedTV page lists other products that can react negatively with Cosopt and explains the problems that could occur as a result.
  • Cosopt Eye Drops
    High eye pressure due to glaucoma or ocular hypertension can be treated with Cosopt eye drops. This eMedTV Web segment provides a brief overview of this prescription drug, including how it works, dosing guidelines, and side effects.
  • Cosopt Glaucoma Drops
    People who have glaucoma may use Cosopt eye drops to treat this condition. This selection from the eMedTV archives briefly explains how this drug works, offers a few safety precautions, and includes a link to more detailed information on this product.
  • Cosopt Overdose
    Although the exact effects of a Cosopt (dorzolamide/timolol) overdose are unknown, this eMedTV segment explains that electrolyte imbalances and metabolic acidosis could result, among other things. This page also describes possible treatment options.
  • Cosopt Side Effects
    Although the medication is generally well tolerated, some people do experience side effects with Cosopt. This eMedTV resource lists commonly reported reactions to this drug, as well as potentially serious side effects that require medical care.
  • Cosopt Uses
    As this eMedTV article explains, the primary use for Cosopt is to treat open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension. This segment describes in detail how this prescription eye drop works, whether it can be used in children, and off-label uses for the drug.
  • Cosopt Warnings and Precautions
    This eMedTV article explains why people who have a history of severe allergic reactions that are treated with epinephrine should use a medication other than Cosopt. Precautions and warnings for people with other medical conditions are also included.
  • Drug Interactions With Carteolol
    Reserpine, methacholine, and other beta blockers may cause carteolol drug interactions. This eMedTV segment lists specific products from these drug classes and describes the problems that may occur if you take these medicines with carteolol.
  • Drug Interactions With Qoliana
    This eMedTV segment features a number of drugs that may cause negative interactions when combined with Qoliana. It also describes how medications that cause drowsiness, MAOIs, and various other products may interfere with these eye drops.
  • Generic Alphagan
    There are generic Alphagan (brimonidine) products currently available. This page from the eMedTV site outlines the various forms and strengths available for the eye medication, and discusses when generic versions of all Alphagan products may be produced.
  • Generic Azopt
    As this eMedTV page explains, there are currently no generic Azopt (brinzolamide) products available. This page discusses when a generic version may become available and explains the difference between a generic name and a generic version of a drug.
  • Generic Betagan
    Currently, there are generic versions of Betagan (levobunolol) available. This eMedTV Web article takes a closer look at the generic eye drops, including information on the various strengths and whether the generics are as good as the brand-name drug.
  • Generic Betimol
    At this time, Betimol (timolol) is not available in generic form. This article from the eMedTV library explains why it is hard to predict when exactly a generic version of Betimol will become available.
  • Generic Combigan
    At this time, no generic versions of Combigan (brimonidine/timolol) are available. This eMedTV segment looks at when a generic version may become available and explains the difference between a generic name and a generic version of a drug.
  • Generic Cosopt
    Because the patent for this medicine has expired, a generic version of Cosopt is now available. This eMedTV Web segment describes how this prescription drug works, how it compares to the brand-name version, and lists some of the companies that make it.
  • Generic Istalol
    As this time, there are no generic Istalol products available. This eMedTV Web resource discusses when a generic version may become available and explains that timolol is the active ingredient in Istalol, rather than a generic version of the drug.
  • Generic Lumigan
    Lumigan (bimatoprost ophthalmic solution) is not available as a generic. This eMedTV Web page explains when a generic version may be available and discusses the dangers of buying so-called "generic Lumigan" before an approved version comes out.
  • Generic Mitosol
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, Mitosol (mitomycin ophthalmic) is only available as a brand-name product. This article explains why companies are not yet allowed to make generic Mitosol products and discusses when generic forms might become available.
  • Generic OptiPranolol
    OptiPranolol (metipranolol) eye drops are currently available in generic form. This eMedTV Web page explains how generic OptiPranolol compares to the brand-name version and lists the strengths available for the generic eye drops.
  • Generic Rescula
    As this eMedTV page explains, Rescula (unoprostone ophthalmic solution) is only available as a brand-name product. This article explains why companies have not yet made generic Rescula products and discusses when generic forms might become available.
  • Generic Timoptic
    Timoptic (timolol) is available in both brand-name and generic form. This article from the eMedTV archives lists the various generic Timoptic products currently available and explains whether these products are equivalent to the brand-name versions.
  • Generic Travatan
    Travatan (travoprost ophthalmic solution) is not yet available in generic form. As this article from the eMedTV library explains, the earliest possible date that generic Travatan could become available is August 2013, when the drug's patent expires.
  • Generic Trusopt
    As this eMedTV resource explains, Trusopt is available in both brand-name and generic form. This article looks at who makes the different versions of this prescription eye drop and explains how generic Trusopt compares to the brand-name product.
  • Generic Xalatan
    As explained in this eMedTV article, Xalatan (latanoprost ophthalmic solution) is now available in generic form. This segment takes a closer look at the generic version of this drug and explains how it compares to the brand-name product.
  • Generic Zioptan
    Companies are not allowed to make a generic Zioptan (tafluprost) at this time. This eMedTV Web selection warns of the potential dangers of buying an unapproved generic version of this drug and explains when an approved generic may become available.
  • Glacoma
    Glaucoma is a group of diseases that share features such as optic nerve damage and high eye pressure. This eMedTV resource lists risk factors for glaucoma and explains what treatments are available. Glacoma is a common misspelling of glaucoma.
  • Glaucoma
    Glaucoma refers to a group of eye diseases that feature high pressure in the eye and other problems. This eMedTV selection offers an in-depth look at this topic, including possible symptoms, diagnosis, treatment options, and more.
  • Glaucoma and Driving
    Because glaucoma can severely reduce your ability to see, it may interfere with your ability to drive. This eMedTV Web page talks about glaucoma and driving. This page also lists several sources of help for those who are no longer able to drive.
  • Glaucoma and Eye Pressure
    Glaucoma and eye pressure, although they typically go hand in hand, are not always linked. This portion of the eMedTV library provides a thorough explanation of the relationship between glaucoma and eye pressure.
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