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Glaucoma Treatment - Timoptic Warnings and Precautions

This page contains links to eMedTV Glaucoma Articles containing information on subjects from Glaucoma Treatment to Timoptic Warnings and Precautions. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Glaucoma Treatment
    As this eMedTV article explains, treatment for glaucoma (such as medications, surgery, and laser surgery) should be administered as soon as possible to avoid more serious vision complications. This page takes a look at these treatment options.
  • Glaucoma Treatments
    Medication and laser surgery are some of the current treatment options for glaucoma. This eMedTV selection gives a brief description of how these options work and includes a link to more detailed information to help you make your decision.
  • Glaucoma Types
    Of the many types of glaucoma, open angle glaucoma is the most common. This eMedTV Web article offers an introduction to the different forms and includes a link to learn more about their symptoms.
  • Glaucome
    Glaucoma is a group of diseases that affect the optic nerve. This article from the eMedTV Web site describes common features of these diseases and explains what treatment options are available. Glaucome is a common misspelling of glaucoma.
  • Glocoma
    Glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness in the United States. This page from the eMedTV library lists characteristics of glaucoma and explains who is at a higher risk for developing the eye disease. Glocoma is a common misspelling of glaucoma.
  • Gloucoma
    Glaucoma is a term used to describe a group of eye diseases that share certain features. This eMedTV segment describes some of these common features and lists risk factors for glaucoma. Gloucoma is a common misspelling of glaucoma.
  • Gluacoma
    Glaucoma is a group of diseases characterized by high pressure within the eye and optic nerve damage. This eMedTV article describes other features and lists possible symptoms of glaucoma. Gluacoma is a common misspelling of glaucoma.
  • Glucoma
    Glaucoma is the name for a group of eye diseases that share certain features. This eMedTV Web page lists some of these common features and describes various treatment options that are available. Glucoma is a common misspelling of glaucoma.
  • Glycoma
    There is currently no cure for glaucoma, a leading cause of blindness in the United States. This eMedTV resource describes the eye disease in more detail and explains how the condition can be controlled. Glycoma is a common misspelling of glaucoma.
  • Isatol
    Istalol is a prescription eye drop used to treat high eye pressure and open angle glaucoma in adults. This eMedTV page discusses Istalol, including information on how it works and potential side effects. Isatol is a common misspelling of Istalol.
  • Istalol
    Istalol is a prescription eye drop used to reduce eye pressure in people with certain eye conditions. This eMedTV page explains how the drug works, describes possible uses, offers general dosing guidelines, and lists some potential side effects.
  • Istalol Dosage
    This eMedTV article explains that for treating glaucoma or high eye pressure, the standard dosage of Istalol is one drop in the affected eye once daily. This page discusses dosing in more detail and offers important tips for using the eye drop.
  • Istalol Drug Interactions
    Epinephrine, digoxin, and reserpine are among the drugs that can interfere with Istalol. This eMedTV Web resource outlines other medications that can cause drug interactions with Istalol and describes the potentially serious problems that may occur.
  • Istalol Eye Drops
    Istalol eye drops may be prescribed to relieve high eye pressure or chronic open angle glaucoma. This eMedTV Web resource takes a further look at how Istalol works, lists possible side effects, and provides some general precautions to be aware of.
  • Istalol Side Effects
    Common side effects of Istalol include temporary eye burning or stinging, blurred vision, and headaches. This eMedTV Web page lists other possible side effects of the eye drops and explains which side effects require immediate medical attention.
  • Istalol Uses
    Istalol is a medication that lowers eye pressure in adults with high eye pressure or open angle glaucoma. This eMedTV Web segment explores uses the uses of Istalol in more detail and explains whether the drug is used off-label for other conditions.
  • Istalol Warnings and Precautions
    You may not be able to safely use Istalol if you have certain medical conditions, such as asthma. This eMedTV article further outlines other important warnings and precautions with Istalol, including what to discuss with your doctor.
  • Lumigan
    Lumigan is a prescription eye drop used to reduce eye pressure in people with certain eye conditions. This eMedTV segment explains how Lumigan works, offers general dosing guidelines for the drug, and lists possible side effects that may occur.
  • Lumigan and Breastfeeding
    It is not known whether Lumigan (bimatoprost ophthalmic solution) is safe for breastfeeding women. This eMedTV Web page discusses the safety of Lumigan and breastfeeding, and explores whether the medication passes through breast milk.
  • Lumigan and Pregnancy
    It is not known whether Lumigan (bimatoprost ophthalmic solution) is safe for use during pregnancy. This eMedTV segment offers more information on Lumigan and pregnancy, and explores the potential risks of using the drug while you are pregnant.
  • Lumigan Dosage
    The suggested Lumigan dosage is one drop into the affected eye(s) once daily in the evening. This part of the eMedTV library discusses Lumigan dosing in more detail and includes a list of important precautions and tips for using the eye drop.
  • Lumigan Drug Interactions
    Other eye drops can interact negatively with Lumigan. As this article from the eMedTV Web site explains, Lumigan drug interactions can reduce the effectiveness of the eye drop or cause a precipitate to form over the eye.
  • Lumigan Eye Drops
    This page of the eMedTV site takes a look at the medicated eye drop Lumigan. It explains what this drug is used for and when it should be applied. This segment briefly addresses side effects and what to do if you wear contacts, with a link to learn more.
  • Lumigan Overdose
    A Lumigan (bimatoprost ophthalmic solution) overdose may cause any of the usual side effects of the drug. This eMedTV resource further explores the possible effects of a Lumigan overdose and explains what treatment options are available.
  • Lumigan Side Effects
    A few common Lumigan side effects include eye discharge, vision changes, and darkening of the iris. This page on the eMedTV Web site lists other possible side effects of Lumigan and explains which side effects require immediate medical attention.
  • Lumigan Uses
    Lumigan is used for lowering eye pressure in people with high eye pressure or open angle glaucoma. This eMedTV Web page explores Lumigan uses in more detail and explains whether the drug is used off-label for other conditions.
  • Lumigan Warnings and Precautions
    If you are pregnant, let your doctor know before using Lumigan. This eMedTV article lists other conditions to tell your doctor about before using Lumigan. Warnings and precautions on what side effects may occur with the drug are also listed here.
  • Mitosol
    Mitosol is a medicine prescribed for use during glaucoma surgery. This selection from the eMedTV Web library offers an overview of this medicine, including details on what it is used for, how it works, potential side effects, and more.
  • Mitosol and Breastfeeding
    It is unknown if Mitosol (mitomycin ophthalmic) passes through breast milk. This page of the eMedTV Web site explains how no research has been done on the possible risks of breastfeeding while using Mitosol and what your doctor may advise.
  • Mitosol and Pregnancy
    Several serious birth defects may occur if Mitosol (mitomycin ophthalmic) is used during pregnancy. This eMedTV page describes some of the problems this drug may cause to an unborn child and explains why pregnant women should not use it.
  • Mitosol Dosage
    As explained in this eMedTV resource, the standard dose of Mitosol is one vial dissolved in 1 mL of sterile water, applied to the surgical area of the eye. This article also discusses what to expect when your healthcare provider administers this drug.
  • Mitosol Drug Interactions
    Although there are no known drug interactions with Mitosol, this eMedTV article explains why it is important to tell your healthcare provider about all medications, vitamins, and supplements you are taking before receiving this product.
  • Mitosol Medication Information
    Mitosol is used during glaucoma surgery to prevent new cells from growing and closing up the surgical site. This eMedTV resource provides more information on the medication, including possible side effects, important safety concerns, and more.
  • Mitosol Overdose
    If too much Mitosol (mitomycin ophthalmic) is used, it may cause holes or thinning in the cornea or sclera. This eMedTV article describes what to expect with an overdose, including information on how a doctor may treat any problems that occur.
  • Mitosol Side Effects
    Contact your doctor immediately if you have watery eyes or bright flashes of light after receiving Mitosol. This eMedTV resource describes some of the other serious side effects of Mitosol that may require treatment, along with other possible problems.
  • Mitosol Uses
    As this eMedTV page explains, Mitosol is used during glaucoma surgery to help prevent the hole that is created in the eye from closing up. This article takes a closer look at what this drug is used for, how it works, and if it is safe for children.
  • Mitosol Warnings and Precautions
    Using Mitosol may increase the risk for changes in the lens of the eye. This part of the eMedTV Web site takes an in-depth look at other important precautions and warnings for Mitosol, including information on who should not receive this drug.
  • Open Angle Glaucoma
    Open angle glaucoma (the most common type) is one of the leading causes of blindness in the United States. This eMedTV Web page describes this condition in detail, with information on possible symptoms, risk factors, treatment options, and more.
  • OptiPranolol
    OptiPranolol is a prescription drug used to lower eye pressure in people with high eye pressure or glaucoma. This eMedTV page explores the effects of this drug, explains when and how to use the eye drops, and discusses potential side effects.
  • OptiPranolol and Breastfeeding
    The full risks of using OptiPranolol (metipranolol) while nursing are currently unknown. This eMedTV segment provides more information on breastfeeding and OptiPranolol, and explains whether this drug is likely to pass through breast milk.
  • OptiPranolol and Pregnancy
    It is not known if OptiPranolol (metipranolol) is safe for use during pregnancy. This page from the eMedTV library offers a more in-depth look at pregnancy and OptiPranolol, and explains how this medication may affect a developing fetus.
  • OptiPranolol Dosage
    There is only one standard dosage of OptiPranolol, regardless of the severity of your condition. As this eMedTV resource explains, the recommended starting dose for lowering eye pressure is one drop in the affected eye twice a day.
  • OptiPranolol Drug Information
    Are you looking for information on the drug OptiPranolol? This eMedTV segment is a great place to start. It takes a look at the uses for this medicated eyedrop, how often it should be used, and what to discuss with your doctor prior to treatment.
  • OptiPranolol Drug Interactions
    Digoxin, reserpine, and certain other medicines may interact with OptiPranolol. As this eMedTV article explains, drug interactions could lead to serious complications such as dangerously low blood pressure, slow heart rate, and breathing problems.
  • OptiPranolol Overdose
    Taking an overdose of OptiPranolol may lead to heart failure, low blood sugar, or slow heart rate. This eMedTV Web page explains what other problems may occur as a result of an overdose and lists various treatment options that are available.
  • OptiPranolol Side Effects
    Temporary eye discomfort is the most common side effect reported with OptiPranolol. This eMedTV Web page lists other possible side effects of the drug, including potentially serious problems that should be reported to your doctor right away.
  • OptiPranolol Uses
    OptiPranolol can help treat high eye pressure and open angle glaucoma. This article from the eMedTV site discusses the uses of OptiPranolol in more detail, describes how this drug works, and explains whether it is approved for use in children.
  • OptiPranolol Warnings and Precautions
    You should not use OptiPranolol if you have asthma or a history of asthma. This eMedTV article contains other warnings and precautions for OptiPranolol, including more information on who should avoid this drug and possible side effects of the medicine.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Carteolol
    Carteolol may cause problems in people with diabetes, as it could mask symptoms of low blood sugar. This eMedTV page offers more precautions and warnings with carteolol, including details on what side effects or complications may occur with this drug.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Qoliana
    In rare cases, Qoliana could make certain conditions like depression or heart disease worse. This eMedTV resource takes a closer look at other important warnings and precautions for using Qoliana safely, including when this product should not be used.
  • Qoliana
    Qoliana eye drops are prescribed to treat ocular hypertension and open angle glaucoma. This eMedTV resource features an overview of this medicine, including details on how it works to lower eye pressure, side effects, dosing instructions, and more.
  • Qoliana and Breastfeeding
    The company that makes Qoliana warns that breastfeeding women should avoid the drug. This eMedTV page examines safety concerns associated with using this drug while nursing, and offers tips on how to minimize absorption of the drug into the breast milk.
  • Qoliana and Pregnancy
    A doctor may prescribe Qoliana to a pregnant woman if the benefits outweigh the possible risk to her fetus. This eMedTV resource explores the safety of using Qoliana during pregnancy and examines the likelihood of this drug affecting a developing fetus.
  • Qoliana Dosage
    Regardless of the severity of your eye condition, the Qoliana dose is the same for everyone. This eMedTV page focuses on specific dosing instructions for lowering eye pressure. It also covers some tips on how to avoid contaminating the eye drops.
  • Qoliana Medication Information
    This eMedTV Web selection features some general information on Qoliana, a medication prescribed to treat high eye pressure caused by certain eye conditions. This page explains how these eye drops are used and how they work. It also links to more details.
  • Qoliana Overdose
    Although Qoliana is an eye drop, it is possible that someone may use too much or swallow the solution. This eMedTV Web selection features details on how an overdose with Qoliana might occur and how any resulting symptoms might be treated.
  • Qoliana Side Effects
    Eye redness, itching, or eye allergies may occur with Qoliana. Other side effects are listed in this eMedTV article, with details on serious problems that require medical treatment. It also covers how to avoid an eye infection with these drops.
  • Rescula
    Rescula is a medicine prescribed to treat open angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension. This selection from the eMedTV Web library offers an overview of this medicine, including details on how it works, potential side effects, dosing guidelines, and more.
  • Rescula & Diabetes
    If you have diabetes, using Rescula could increase your risk for macular edema. This part of the eMedTV Web library examines how this eye drop may not be safe for some people and offers a link to more detailed safety warnings for Rescula.
  • Rescula and Breastfeeding
    It is unknown if Rescula (unoprostone ophthalmic solution) passes through breast milk. This page of the eMedTV Web site explains how no research has been done on the possible risks of breastfeeding while using Rescula and what your doctor may advise.
  • Rescula and Pregnancy
    This eMedTV article discusses Rescula (unoprostone ophthalmic solution) and pregnancy. It talks about the results of animal studies, how the FDA rates the safety of drugs during pregnancy, and circumstances in which the medication may still be used.
  • Rescula Dosage
    As explained in this eMedTV resource, the standard dose of Rescula is one drop used in the affected eye(s) twice a day. This article also gives a list of tips for how to use these eye drops and discusses ways to avoid contaminating the medicine.
  • Rescula Drug Interactions
    This eMedTV Web page offers details on some of the products that may cause drug interactions with Rescula. This article describes the complications that may occur and discusses whether Rescula can be used with other eye drop medications.
  • Rescula Medication Information
    Rescula is used to lower eye pressure in people with ocular hypertension or open angle glaucoma. This eMedTV resource provides more information on the medication, including possible side effects of Rescula, dosing guidelines, and more.
  • Rescula Overdose
    If too much Rescula (unoprostone ophthalmic solution) is used, it may cause eye irritation or redness. This eMedTV article describes what to expect with an overdose, including information on how a doctor may treat any problems that occur.
  • Rescula Side Effects
    Notify your doctor immediately if you see "halos" or your vision becomes cloudy after using Rescula. This eMedTV page describes some of the other potentially dangerous side effects of Rescula that may require treatment, as well as less-serious reactions.
  • Rescula Uses
    As this selection from the eMedTV Web library explains, Rescula is used to treat open angle glaucoma and ocular hypertension. This article takes a closer look at the drug's uses, with details on how Rescula works and if it is safe for children.
  • Rescula Warnings and Precautions
    Using Rescula may cause changes in eye color or other problems. This part of the eMedTV Web site takes an in-depth look at other important precautions and warnings for Rescula, including information on who should not use these eye drops.
  • Side Effects of Carteolol
    Common side effects of carteolol may include watery eyes, eye swelling, and eye irritation. As this eMedTV resource explains, while most side effects of the drug are mild, some -- like chest pain or depression -- may require immediate medical attention.
  • Temoptic
    Timoptic is a prescription eye drop used to lower eye pressure in people with certain eye conditions. This eMedTV Web page discusses Timoptic uses in more detail and explains how this medication works. Temoptic is a common misspelling of Timoptic.
  • Timoptic
    Timoptic is a prescription eye drop used to lower eye pressure in people with high eye pressure or glaucoma. This eMedTV segment describes this product in more detail, including how the medication works, possible side effects, and more.
  • Timoptic Dosage
    For Timoptic-XE gel-forming solution, the recommended dose is one drop in each affected eye once daily. This eMedTV article also offers dosage recommendations for other forms of Timoptic and offers tips for using the eye drops.
  • Timoptic Drug Interactions
    Clonidine, digoxin, and reserpine are some of the medicines that may cause drug interactions with Timoptic. This eMedTV page describes the potential effects of these interactions and lists other medicines that may cause an interaction.
  • Timoptic Medication Information
    Timoptic is prescribed to treat high eye pressure and a certain type of glaucoma. This eMedTV Web page offers some helpful information about Timoptic, including details on the medication's side effects and what to discuss with your doctor.
  • Timoptic Side Effects
    Common side effects of Timoptic include pink eye, headaches, and dizziness. This eMedTV page lists other possible side effects, including rare but possible side effects, as well as potentially serious problems that require medical attention.
  • Timoptic Uses
    Timoptic is licensed to reduce eye pressure in people with open angle glaucoma or high eye pressure. This eMedTV article discusses the uses of Timoptic in more detail, describes how the drug works, and explains whether it may be used in children.
  • Timoptic Warnings and Precautions
    You should not use Timoptic if you have asthma. This eMedTV article offers more information on who should not use this drug. Warnings and precautions on what side effects or complications may occur with Timoptic are also listed on this page.
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