Glaucoma Articles A-Z

Acute Glaucoma - Carteolol Dosage

This page contains links to eMedTV Glaucoma Articles containing information on subjects from Acute Glaucoma to Carteolol Dosage. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Acute Glaucoma
    Although acute glaucoma occurs in less than 10 percent of glaucoma cases, it can cause rapid loss of vision. This eMedTV resource offers an in-depth look at this serious condition and its causes, symptoms, and treatment options.
  • Alfagan
    A healthcare provider may prescribe Alphagan to treat open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension. This eMedTV segment explains how these eye drops work and describes some general dosing information. Alfagan is a common misspelling of Alphagan.
  • Alfgan Eye Drops
    Alphagan, a prescribed eye drop used to lower eye pressure, works by decreasing fluid production in the eye. This eMedTV page describes approved uses and potential side effects of this drug. Alfgan eye drops is a common misspelling of Alphagan eye drops.
  • Alphagan
    Alphagan is a medicated eye drop used for lowering eye pressure in people with certain eye conditions. This eMedTV Web article provides an overview of this drug, including information on how it works, when to use it, possible side effects, and more.
  • Alphagan and Breastfeeding
    It is not known if Alphagan (brimonidine) passes through human breast milk. This eMedTV segment offers more information on breastfeeding and Alphagan, and explains why the manufacturer of this drug recommends avoiding it while nursing.
  • Alphagan and Pregnancy
    As a pregnancy Category B drug, Alphagan (brimonidine) is probably safe to use while pregnant. This eMedTV page further explores using this product during pregnancy, and explains what happened when large doses were given to pregnant animals.
  • Alphagan Dosage
    The standard Alphagan dosage is one drop of the solution in the affected eye(s) three times daily. This eMedTV page offers doing guidelines for the two formulations of Alphagan and highlights several tips on when and how to use these eye drops.
  • Alphagan Drug Interactions
    Blood pressure medications and antidepressants may cause drug interactions with Alphagan. This page from the eMedTV Web site describes the potential dangers of these interactions and lists several other medicines that may interfere with the eye drop.
  • Alphagan Medication Information
    Alphagan is a prescribed eye medication used to treat open-angle glaucoma and ocular hypertension. This eMedTV page offers important information on Alphagan, including dosing guidelines for the medication and a list of some possible side effects.
  • Alphagan Overdose
    It is probably possible to take too much Alphagan (brimonidine). This selection from the eMedTV Web library explores the potential effects of an overdose and describes the various treatment options that are available in these cases.
  • Alphagan Side Effects
    Common side effects of Alphagan may include red eyes, blurred vision, and headaches. This eMedTV Web segment lists other common side effects of the drug and also explains which problems are potentially serious and require medical attention.
  • Alphagan Uses
    Alphagan can help lower eye pressure in people with high eye pressure and open-angle glaucoma. This eMedTV resource discusses the uses of Alphagan in more detail, describes how this drug works, and explains whether it is approved for use in children.
  • Alphagan Warnings and Precautions
    You may not be able to use Alphagan if you have depression or heart disease. This page from the eMedTV Web library offers more warnings and precautions with Alphagan, including information on side effects and complications that may occur with this drug.
  • Alphagen
    Alphagan is a prescription eye drop used to lower eye pressure in people with glaucoma or high eye pressure. This eMedTV Web page explains how Alphagan works and lists some of its potential side effects. Alphagen is a common misspelling of Alphagan.
  • Alphagon
    Alphagan eye drops may be prescribed to treat open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension. This eMedTV resource further describes these uses, covers general safety precautions, and lists side effects. Alphagon is a common misspelling of Alphagan.
  • Alphgan
    Alphagan is a prescribed eye drop licensed to treat open-angle glaucoma and ocular hypertension. This eMedTV segment describes Alphagan in more detail and offers general precautions for using the drug. Alphgan is a common misspelling of Alphagan.
  • Asopt
    A healthcare provider may prescribe Azopt to treat ocular hypertension or open-angle glaucoma. This eMedTV segment highlights possible side effects and provides a link to more information. Asopt is a common misspelling of Azopt.
  • Azopt
    Azopt is a prescription eye drop licensed to treat high eye pressure. This article from the eMedTV Web library explains how this medication works, describes possible side effects, and covers some general dosing guidelines.
  • Azopt 1% Information
    As this eMedTV article discusses, Azopt is a medication prescribed for treating open-angle glaucoma and ocular hypertension. This article offers important information on Azopt 1% ophthalmic suspension, including dosing tips and possible side effects.
  • Azopt and Breastfeeding
    This eMedTV Web page explains that it may not be safe to use Azopt (brinzolamide) while breastfeeding, as the medicine may pass through breast milk and could cause problems. This article also discusses the manufacturer's recommendation on the topic.
  • Azopt and Pregnancy
    It may not be safe to use Azopt (brinzolamide) during pregnancy. This eMedTV Web article explains what problems occurred when the drug was given to pregnant animals and covers what to discuss with your doctor before using this medication.
  • Azopt Dosage
    The standard Azopt dose for treating high eye pressure is one drop in the affected eye(s) three times daily. This eMedTV Web segment offers detailed dosing guidelines for this eye drop, including tips on when and how to effectively use this product.
  • Azopt Drug Interactions
    Because drug interactions with Azopt can cause serious problems, this eMedTV Web article offers information on how to reduce your risk. This includes a list of drugs that may interact negatively, as well as information on the problems that can occur.
  • Azopt Eye Drop Information
    Available by prescription, Azopt is a medication used to treat open-angle glaucoma and ocular hypertension. This eMedTV Web article provides important information on Azopt eye drops, including possible side effects and safety precautions.
  • Azopt for Glaucoma
    Azopt is a type of eye medication approved for treating open-angle glaucoma. This eMedTV Web page further discusses using Azopt for glaucoma treatment, including how the drug works to lower eye pressure. Other possible uses are also listed.
  • Azopt Overdose
    As this eMedTV page explains, an overdose of Azopt (brinzolamide) may cause problems, such as electrolyte imbalances. This article takes a closer look at what could happen when people take too much Azopt and describes possible treatment options.
  • Azopt Side Effects
    Some of the commonly reported side effects of Azopt include blurred vision and an unusual taste. This eMedTV Web segment explores the severity of these and other side effects, and describes which ones may require immediate medical attention.
  • Azopt Uses
    Open-angle glaucoma and ocular hypertension can be treated with Azopt. This selection from the eMedTV Web archives covers these and other uses of Azopt in more detail, including whether it's safe for children and possible off-label uses.
  • Azopt Warnings and Precautions
    You may not be able to safely use Azopt if you have liver or kidney disease. This page from the eMedTV Web library discusses other precautions and warnings with Azopt and covers what to discuss with your doctor before using this eye medication.
  • Betagan
    Betagan is a prescription eye drop used to treat high eye pressure or chronic open angle glaucoma. This eMedTV Web segment describes how this medication works, offers information on how to use the eye drop, and lists some side effects that may occur.
  • Betagan and Breastfeeding
    No studies have been done to see if Betagan (levobunolol) passes through breast milk in humans. This eMedTV Web resource offers more details on breastfeeding and Betagan, including information on what the manufacturer of the drug recommends.
  • Betagan and Pregnancy
    Betagan (levobunolol) may not be safe during pregnancy, as it is a pregnancy Category C drug. This eMedTV Web segment provides more information on pregnancy and Betagan, including details on the problems that occurred during animal studies.
  • Betagan Dosage
    As this eMedTV page explains, the recommended starting dose of Betagan is one to two drops in the affected eye(s) once or twice daily. This article provides more detailed dosing guidelines and includes several tips on how to safely use this eye drop.
  • Betagan Drug Interactions
    Other beta blockers, reserpine, and digoxin may cause potentially serious drug interactions with Betagan. This eMedTV page lists other medications that may interfere with Betagan and describes the complications that these interactions may cause.
  • Betagan Eyedrops
    As this part of the eMedTV site explains, Betagan eyedrops can be very helpful in cases of high eye pressure. This Web page looks at when and how to use these eyedrops, as well as what types of side effects may occur.
  • Betagan Overdose
    If you take an overdose of Betagan (levobunolol), it can result in potentially dangerous complications. This eMedTV Web page describes the possible symptoms of an overdose and outlines some treatment options that are available in the case of an overdose.
  • Betagan Side Effects
    Common side effects of Betagan include eye burning or stinging and inflammation of the lining of the eyelid. This eMedTV page lists other common side effects and also explains which problems are potentially serious and require prompt medical care.
  • Betagan Uses
    As this eMedTV page explains, Betagan may be prescribed to lower eye pressure in people with open angle glaucoma. This article covers the uses of Betagan in more detail, explains how this eye drop works, and discusses its use in children.
  • Betagan Warnings and Precautions
    You may not be able to take Betagan if you have certain medical conditions, such as COPD or heart block. This eMedTV page further discusses important warnings and precautions for Betagan, including what to tell your doctor before using this eye drop.
  • Betamol
    Betimol is a prescription eye drop used to lower eye pressure in people with glaucoma or high eye pressure. This eMedTV page explains how Betimol works and lists some of its potential side effects. Betamol is a common misspelling of Betimol.
  • Betimol
    Betimol is a medicated eye drop used for lowering eye pressure in people with certain eye conditions. This eMedTV resource offers an overview of this drug, including information on how it works, when to take it, possible side effects, and more.
  • Betimol Dosage
    The usual starting dosage of Betimol is one drop of the solution in each affected eye twice daily. As this eMedTV page explains, if the 0.25 percent solution is not effective at lowering eye pressure, your doctor may recommend the 0.5 percent solution.
  • Betimol Drug Interactions
    Reserpine, clonidine, and certain other medications may cause drug interactions with Betimol. This page on the eMedTV site describes the potential dangers of these drug interactions and explains what other medicines may interact with the eye drop.
  • Betimol Eye Drops
    Betimol is a prescription drug used to lower eye pressure in people with high eye pressure or glaucoma. This eMedTV page explains how often the eye drops are typically used, describes how Betimol works, and lists some potential side effects.
  • Betimol Side Effects
    Common side effects of Betimol may include red eyes, blurred vision, and inflammation of the eyelids. This eMedTV Web page lists other common side effects of the drug and also explains which problems are potentially serious and require medical attention.
  • Betimol Uses
    Betimol can help lower eye pressure in people with high eye pressure and open angle glaucoma. This eMedTV article discusses the uses of Betimol in more detail, describes how this drug works, and explains whether it is approved for use in children.
  • Betimol Warnings and Precautions
    You should not use Betimol if you have severe COPD. This eMedTV segment offers more warnings and precautions on Betimol, including information on side effects or complications that may occur with this drug.
  • Carteolol
    Carteolol is a prescription eye drop used to treat open angle glaucoma and high eye pressure. This eMedTV Web page talks about the drug in more detail, including information on how it works and some of the potential side effects that may occur.
  • Carteolol Dosage
    The recommended starting dosage of carteolol is one drop in the affected eye(s) twice a day. This page on the eMedTV Web site contains more dosing information on this product, including tips on how to prevent contamination of the eye drops.
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